Who we are:
The only student-run market research initiative that provides quick, engaging, and relevant market knowledge about UP students.

What we want to do:
Provide UP students, who love learning new things about themselves and their surroundings, market knowledge that is interesting to them and at the same time relevant to end users.


Choosing a partner is not that easy, there are lots of thing to be considered base on our attitudes and principles, as well as the things that we see, hear, feel, experience, etc. And since the organization wanted to find out U.P Diliman student’s perception of love, the level of their preferences in choosing a partner was considered and based on the survey results;

Respondents found good moral character (2.92), good pleasing personality (2.88) and intelligence (2.84) as most important in choosing a partner. They also found that gender (2.81) and the making of a good spouse (2.77) were important. On the other hand study shows that they neither find nationality (2.15), being in U.P (2.05), and skin color (1.99) as important and they do not consider political views (1.98) and race (1.97) as important in choosing a partner.

The findings suggest that UP students prefer someone of good moral character and personality and they do not see race and skin color as important in choosing a partner. Also, the fact that U.P is a non-catholic democratic school clearly shows that the U.P Diliman students respect each other’s belief and principle regarding different issues especially when it comes to political. Thus, students don’t give much attention on these matters when it comes to partner preference. On the other hand, it’s not surprising why U.P student’s, which is known for being intellectual and accountable, considers intelligence as one of the most important thing in choosing a partner. On the contrary to these, while intelligence is being considered as important, based on the results, (see table 3) “taga-U.P,” is not given much attention in choosing their preferences which shows that U.P students Is not biased when it comes to their partner preference.

Choosing a partner is not that easy, there are lots of thing to be considered base on our attitudes and principles, as well as the things that we see, hear, feel, experience, etc. And since the organization wanted to find out U.P Diliman student’s perception of love, the level of their preferences in choosing a partner was considered and based on the survey results;

Respondents found good moral character (2.92), good pleasing personality (2.88) and intelligence (2.84) as most important in choosing a partner. They also found that gender (2.81) and the making of a good spouse (2.77) were important. On the other hand study shows that they neither find nationality (2.15), being in U.P (2.05), and skin color (1.99) as important and they do not consider political views (1.98) and race (1.97) as important in choosing a partner.

The findings suggest that UP students prefer someone of good moral character and personality and they do not see race and skin color as important in choosing a partner. Also, the fact that U.P is a non-catholic democratic school clearly shows that the U.P Diliman students respect each other’s belief and principle regarding different issues especially when it comes to political. Thus, students don’t give much attention on these matters when it comes to partner preference. On the other hand, it’s not surprising why U.P student’s, which is known for being intellectual and accountable, considers intelligence as one of the most important thing in choosing a partner. On the contrary to these, while intelligence is being considered as important, based on the results, (see table 3) “taga-U.P,” is not given much attention in choosing their preferences which shows that U.P students Is not biased when it comes to their partner preference.

7 months ago with 10 notes
For the respondents, romantic love is not easily found, but it is attainable. Romantic love is fun, perhaps because of its characteristic privacy, but it demands maturity and reciprocity to satisfy the feelings of those involved. Romantic love, however, is identified more as a conscious commitment than a fleeting feeling. Because of these, it seems to be both fair and unfair. The struggle of the selfish to become selfless is perhaps why romantic love is always suspended between temporary and forever.

Using a 7-point semantic differential scale with 15 pairs of opposite descriptive words, the 312 respondents were asked on their perception and attitudes on what better describes romantic love. The yielded mean scores were generally in the middle, in between the scores of positive and negative descriptive words. Respondents view romantic love as neither unfair nor fair (4.21), neither temporary nor forever (4.17), neither private nor public (3.76), neither choosy nor not choosy (3.7), and neither rare nor common (3.68). On the other hand, the yielded high mean scores were descriptions about romantic love as attainable (6.15), fun (5.96) and mature (5.59)


This middle perception parallel’s the literature that there is no single, all-encompassing description of romantic love and that concepts are based upon what people consider to be its archetype (Krass, 2007). This means that respondents’ perception of romantic love is based from their beliefs and behavior (Krass, 2007).And their beliefs and behaviors can be different from one another. But respondents do share commonality in some aspects of romantic love. As what the results have shown, anyone can attain romantic love, it is fun and mature. It is recommended that probing of romantic love descriptions should be undertaken for better understanding as to how and why respondents perceive that way.

For the respondents, romantic love is not easily found, but it is attainable. Romantic love is fun, perhaps because of its characteristic privacy, but it demands maturity and reciprocity to satisfy the feelings of those involved. Romantic love, however, is identified more as a conscious commitment than a fleeting feeling. Because of these, it seems to be both fair and unfair. The struggle of the selfish to become selfless is perhaps why romantic love is always suspended between temporary and forever.

Using a 7-point semantic differential scale with 15 pairs of opposite descriptive words, the 312 respondents were asked on their perception and attitudes on what better describes romantic love. The yielded mean scores were generally in the middle, in between the scores of positive and negative descriptive words. Respondents view romantic love as neither unfair nor fair (4.21), neither temporary nor forever (4.17), neither private nor public (3.76), neither choosy nor not choosy (3.7), and neither rare nor common (3.68). On the other hand, the yielded high mean scores were descriptions about romantic love as attainable (6.15), fun (5.96) and mature (5.59)

This middle perception parallel’s the literature that there is no single, all-encompassing description of romantic love and that concepts are based upon what people consider to be its archetype (Krass, 2007). This means that respondents’ perception of romantic love is based from their beliefs and behavior (Krass, 2007).And their beliefs and behaviors can be different from one another. But respondents do share commonality in some aspects of romantic love. As what the results have shown, anyone can attain romantic love, it is fun and mature. It is recommended that probing of romantic love descriptions should be undertaken for better understanding as to how and why respondents perceive that way.

7 months ago with 18 notes

On 2009, the UP Communication Research Society surveyed 312 UP Diliman students to determine their perceptions, attitudes, and behavior toward romantic love. Selected through stratified sampling, the students’ names were taken from the list of enrollees in UP Diliman for the school year 2008-2009 that the organization obtained from the Office of the University Registrar.
Of the 312 respondents, 288 classified themselves as straight. 12 classified themselves as gay, and another 12 classified themselves as bisexuals. 218 of them were females while 94 were males, and their average age was 20 years old.
90 respondents came from the College of Engineering, 30 from the College of Mass Communication, while 27 came from the College of Home Economics. The rest came from different colleges in the campus. 45 out of the 167 that indicated their income came from households with monthly income of more than PhP 75,000.
229 of the respondents were Roman Catholic while 47 classified themselves as Christians. Of the 47, 40 indicated that they were single.

(Based on the original write-up of the study on its respondents’ profiles.)

On 2009, the UP Communication Research Society surveyed 312 UP Diliman students to determine their perceptions, attitudes, and behavior toward romantic love. Selected through stratified sampling, the students’ names were taken from the list of enrollees in UP Diliman for the school year 2008-2009 that the organization obtained from the Office of the University Registrar.

Of the 312 respondents, 288 classified themselves as straight. 12 classified themselves as gay, and another 12 classified themselves as bisexuals. 218 of them were females while 94 were males, and their average age was 20 years old.

90 respondents came from the College of Engineering, 30 from the College of Mass Communication, while 27 came from the College of Home Economics. The rest came from different colleges in the campus. 45 out of the 167 that indicated their income came from households with monthly income of more than PhP 75,000.

229 of the respondents were Roman Catholic while 47 classified themselves as Christians. Of the 47, 40 indicated that they were single.

(Based on the original write-up of the study on its respondents’ profiles.)

8 months ago with 16 notes
Full list of behaviors

679 students of UP Diliman were surveyed from December 9-16, 2010 for UP CommResSoc’s “Kabaka Ka Pa Ba?” study, and based on the results of the 3rd level of engagement (Mobilization): 
The respondents very rarely joined and participated in socio-political demonstrations, campaigns, and the like. When compared with the overall level of involvement in level 2 activities (expression), the overall level of involvement in the level 3 activities (mobilization) dropped 1.16 points in difference, confirming the inverse relationship between the level of involvement of UP student respondents and the level of social and political activities. This relationship, though, has not been established to be statistically significant. More importantly, these findings do not represent the engagement of the entire UP Diliman student population, given the fact that activities on mobilization in the campus are still continuing.

Methodology
The organization used a quantitative-qualitative approach. Multi-stage sampling was employed for the quantitative part wherein a self-administered survey questionnaire was designed and distributed to 12 randomly selected colleges in UP Diliman. The four most populous colleges were automatically included (CSSP, ENG’G, CAL, and CS) in the sample. The researchers opted to equally distribute the survey forms across year levels by convenience. Out of the 800 survey forms distributed, 679 were returned. For the qualitative part, focus interviews were facilitated in order to delve more on UP students’ motivations behind engagement or disengagement in social and political activities within and/or outside the university. Sixteen (16) informants coming from different social and political orientations (with levels of political engagements ranging from high to low) were interviewed from different colleges in the university.
The researchers divided UP students’ engagement in different activities into three levels depending on how much effort was spent on certain activities. Activities on Level 3 can be described as mobilization-oriented activities ranging from paraphernalia distribution, to boycotts and strikes, and to mass demonstrations.
In this study, the researchers used the term social and political activities throughout the study in referring to levels 1, 2, and 3 activities. Respondents were asked to rate from 1 to 5 how often they engage in social and political activities described in the questionnaire.
Data obtained from the survey questionnaires of 679 sampled respondents were encoded and analyzed using descriptive and crosstabs statistics through Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. Meanwhile, data from the focus interviews were used to support findings from the quantitative part.

For the purposes of this study, the researchers defined university issues as the most popular issues mainly concerning UP at the time. The same thing goes with national issues, which is the term the researchers used to refer to the most popular issues mainly concerning the country at the time. Among the university and national issues presented in the study, respondents were most knowledgeable about the Ampatuan massacre.

Full list of behaviors

679 students of UP Diliman were surveyed from December 9-16, 2010 for UP CommResSoc’s “Kabaka Ka Pa Ba?” study, and based on the results of the 3rd level of engagement (Mobilization):

The respondents very rarely joined and participated in socio-political demonstrations, campaigns, and the like. When compared with the overall level of involvement in level 2 activities (expression), the overall level of involvement in the level 3 activities (mobilization) dropped 1.16 points in difference, confirming the inverse relationship between the level of involvement of UP student respondents and the level of social and political activities. This relationship, though, has not been established to be statistically significant. More importantly, these findings do not represent the engagement of the entire UP Diliman student population, given the fact that activities on mobilization in the campus are still continuing.

Methodology

The organization used a quantitative-qualitative approach. Multi-stage sampling was employed for the quantitative part wherein a self-administered survey questionnaire was designed and distributed to 12 randomly selected colleges in UP Diliman. The four most populous colleges were automatically included (CSSP, ENG’G, CAL, and CS) in the sample. The researchers opted to equally distribute the survey forms across year levels by convenience. Out of the 800 survey forms distributed, 679 were returned. For the qualitative part, focus interviews were facilitated in order to delve more on UP students’ motivations behind engagement or disengagement in social and political activities within and/or outside the university. Sixteen (16) informants coming from different social and political orientations (with levels of political engagements ranging from high to low) were interviewed from different colleges in the university.

The researchers divided UP students’ engagement in different activities into three levels depending on how much effort was spent on certain activities. Activities on Level 3 can be described as mobilization-oriented activities ranging from paraphernalia distribution, to boycotts and strikes, and to mass demonstrations.

In this study, the researchers used the term social and political activities throughout the study in referring to levels 1, 2, and 3 activities. Respondents were asked to rate from 1 to 5 how often they engage in social and political activities described in the questionnaire.

Data obtained from the survey questionnaires of 679 sampled respondents were encoded and analyzed using descriptive and crosstabs statistics through Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. Meanwhile, data from the focus interviews were used to support findings from the quantitative part.

For the purposes of this study, the researchers defined university issues as the most popular issues mainly concerning UP at the time. The same thing goes with national issues, which is the term the researchers used to refer to the most popular issues mainly concerning the country at the time. Among the university and national issues presented in the study, respondents were most knowledgeable about the Ampatuan massacre.

679 students of UP Diliman were surveyed from December 9-16, 2010 for UP Communication Research Society’s “Kabaka Ka Pa Ba?” study, and based on the results; the respondents rarely expressed their views regarding socio-political issues. When compared with the overall level of involvement in the level 1 activities (awareness), the overall level of involvement in level 2 activities (expression) dropped 0.61 points in difference, showing a downward movement in the score as the level of engagement went up. However, this does not mean that UP students in general do not express their opinions and support social/political causes; nor does this mean that the low level of involvement for level 2 activities is true for all cases of social/political issues.

Methodology
The organization used a quantitative-qualitative approach. Multi-stage sampling was employed for the quantitative part wherein a self-administered survey questionnaire was designed and distributed to 12 randomly selected colleges in UP Diliman. The four most populous colleges were automatically included (CSSP, ENG’G, CAL, and CS) in the sample. The researchers opted to equally distribute the survey forms across year levels by convenience. Out of the 800 survey forms distributed, 679 were returned. For the qualitative part, focus interviews were facilitated in order to delve more on UP students’ motivations behind engagement or disengagement in social and political activities within and/or outside the university. Sixteen (16) informants coming from different social and political orientations (with levels of political engagements ranging from high to low) were interviewed from different colleges in the university.
The researchers divided UP students’ engagement in different activities into three levels depending on how much effort was spent on certain activities. Compared to Level 1 activities (awareness), activities on Level 2 are more expressive of respondents’ thoughts and dispositions on different issues. Activities on Level two include verbal expression of sentiments on issues, expression through the new media, and wearing of different products promoting a particular cause.
In this study, the researchers used the term social and political activities throughout the study in referring to levels 1, 2, and 3 activities. Respondents were asked to rate from 1 to 5 how often they engage in social and political activities described in the questionnaire.
Data obtained from the survey questionnaires of 679 sampled respondents were encoded and analyzed using descriptive and crosstabs statistics through Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. Meanwhile, data from the focus interviews were used to support findings from the quantitative part.

For the purposes of this study, the researchers defined university issues as the most popular issues mainly concerning UP at the time. The same thing goes with national issues, which is the term the researchers used to refer to the most popular issues mainly concerning the country at the time. Among the university and national issues presented in the study, respondents were most knowledgeable about the Ampatuan massacre.

679 students of UP Diliman were surveyed from December 9-16, 2010 for UP Communication Research Society’s “Kabaka Ka Pa Ba?” study, and based on the results; the respondents rarely expressed their views regarding socio-political issues. When compared with the overall level of involvement in the level 1 activities (awareness), the overall level of involvement in level 2 activities (expression) dropped 0.61 points in difference, showing a downward movement in the score as the level of engagement went up. However, this does not mean that UP students in general do not express their opinions and support social/political causes; nor does this mean that the low level of involvement for level 2 activities is true for all cases of social/political issues.

Methodology

The organization used a quantitative-qualitative approach. Multi-stage sampling was employed for the quantitative part wherein a self-administered survey questionnaire was designed and distributed to 12 randomly selected colleges in UP Diliman. The four most populous colleges were automatically included (CSSP, ENG’G, CAL, and CS) in the sample. The researchers opted to equally distribute the survey forms across year levels by convenience. Out of the 800 survey forms distributed, 679 were returned. For the qualitative part, focus interviews were facilitated in order to delve more on UP students’ motivations behind engagement or disengagement in social and political activities within and/or outside the university. Sixteen (16) informants coming from different social and political orientations (with levels of political engagements ranging from high to low) were interviewed from different colleges in the university.

The researchers divided UP students’ engagement in different activities into three levels depending on how much effort was spent on certain activities. Compared to Level 1 activities (awareness), activities on Level 2 are more expressive of respondents’ thoughts and dispositions on different issues. Activities on Level two include verbal expression of sentiments on issues, expression through the new media, and wearing of different products promoting a particular cause.

In this study, the researchers used the term social and political activities throughout the study in referring to levels 1, 2, and 3 activities. Respondents were asked to rate from 1 to 5 how often they engage in social and political activities described in the questionnaire.

Data obtained from the survey questionnaires of 679 sampled respondents were encoded and analyzed using descriptive and crosstabs statistics through Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. Meanwhile, data from the focus interviews were used to support findings from the quantitative part.

For the purposes of this study, the researchers defined university issues as the most popular issues mainly concerning UP at the time. The same thing goes with national issues, which is the term the researchers used to refer to the most popular issues mainly concerning the country at the time. Among the university and national issues presented in the study, respondents were most knowledgeable about the Ampatuan massacre.

9 months ago with 2 notes
679 students of UP Diliman were surveyed from December 9-16, 2010 for UP CommResSoc’s “Kabaka Ka Pa Ba?” study, and based on the results; they had average voluntary involvement in information-seeking activities regarding civic issues. This is to say that despite having curiosity about current issues, they seldom engage in activities that sought to understand matters in-depth.
Methodology
The organization used a quantitative-qualitative approach. Multi-stage sampling was employed for the quantitative part wherein a self-administered survey questionnaire was designed and distributed to 12 randomly selected colleges in UPD. The four most populous colleges were automatically included (CSSP, ENG’G, CAL, and CS) in the sample. The researchers opted to equally distribute the survey forms across year levels by convenience. Out of the 800 survey forms distributed, 679 were returned. For the qualitative part, focus interviews were facilitated in order to delve more on UP students’ motivations behind engagement or disengagement in social and political activities within and/or outside the university. Sixteen (16) informants coming from different social and political orientations (with levels of political engagements ranging from high to low) were interviewed from different colleges in the university.
The researchers divided UP students’ engagement in different activities into three levels depending on how much effort was spent on certain activities. Activities on Level 1 involve information-seeking activities such as reading the Philippine Collegian, keeping track of issues respondents are already aware of, attending with family, friends, or classmates.
In this study, the researchers used the term social and political activities throughout the study in referring to levels 1, 2, and 3 activities. Respondents were asked to rate from 1 to 5 how often then engage in social and political activities stated in the questionnaire.

Data obtained from the survey questionnaires of 679 sampled respondents were encoded and analyzed using descriptive and crosstabs statistics through Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. Meanwhile, data from the focus interviews were used to support some findings from the quantitative part.

679 students of UP Diliman were surveyed from December 9-16, 2010 for UP CommResSoc’s “Kabaka Ka Pa Ba?” study, and based on the results; they had average voluntary involvement in information-seeking activities regarding civic issues. This is to say that despite having curiosity about current issues, they seldom engage in activities that sought to understand matters in-depth.

Methodology

The organization used a quantitative-qualitative approach. Multi-stage sampling was employed for the quantitative part wherein a self-administered survey questionnaire was designed and distributed to 12 randomly selected colleges in UPD. The four most populous colleges were automatically included (CSSP, ENG’G, CAL, and CS) in the sample. The researchers opted to equally distribute the survey forms across year levels by convenience. Out of the 800 survey forms distributed, 679 were returned. For the qualitative part, focus interviews were facilitated in order to delve more on UP students’ motivations behind engagement or disengagement in social and political activities within and/or outside the university. Sixteen (16) informants coming from different social and political orientations (with levels of political engagements ranging from high to low) were interviewed from different colleges in the university.

The researchers divided UP students’ engagement in different activities into three levels depending on how much effort was spent on certain activities. Activities on Level 1 involve information-seeking activities such as reading the Philippine Collegian, keeping track of issues respondents are already aware of, attending with family, friends, or classmates.

In this study, the researchers used the term social and political activities throughout the study in referring to levels 1, 2, and 3 activities. Respondents were asked to rate from 1 to 5 how often then engage in social and political activities stated in the questionnaire.

Data obtained from the survey questionnaires of 679 sampled respondents were encoded and analyzed using descriptive and crosstabs statistics through Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. Meanwhile, data from the focus interviews were used to support some findings from the quantitative part.

10 months ago with 5 notes
UP has always been known for its high involvement in national, political, and economic undertakings. One of the concrete manifestations of this involvement is the practice of activism within its bounds, which is a characteristic often associated with UP. It is even said that the university’s student political affairs may well be deemed as a microcosm of national politics (Abinales, 1992). Its standing as a leading academic foundation of the country earned its activism dynamics a national significance.

1950s
-          1950s: A faction formed between UP’s two major activist forces, the Greek-lettered fraternities and the Catholic group associated with the UP Student Catholic Action (UPSCA) (Abinales, 1992).
-          “From the time I entered UP in 1956 up to 1959, there was mass apathy among the students.” (Sison, 2008)
-          1959: The Student Cultural Association of the University of the Philippines (SCAUP) was organized with cultural nationalism as their battle cry.

1960s
-          1962:  Students showed their disapproval of the appointment of Carlos P. Romulo as UP President through demonstrations and counter-demonstrations led by the Student Union and the UPSCA, respectively (Epistola, 1985).
-          Mid-1960s, “Americanization” of the University was a big issue. The SCAUP, Kabataang Makabayan (KM), and University Student Council (USC) took the lead in protesting.
-          1968: Katipunang Makabansa, Kalayaan, Pagkakaisa, Samahan ng Demokratikong Kabataan (SDK), SCAUP, and KM and Partisans together with the USC and the Philippine Collegian staff were among the organizations in UP Diliman actively participated in mass protests (Epistola, 1985).
-          Before Romulo left his position as President, he asserted that student activism and faculty dissent were “in themselves important, for without them, the University of the Philippines would be nothing.” (Epistola, 1985).

1970s
-          Students got more involved in matters concerning other members of Philippine society such as the laborers, farmers, etc.
-          1971: During the gasoline price hike a 2 day blockade through barricades was organized by students in the University Avenue. Within the barricades were teach-ins and mass meetings. (Evangelista, 1985).
-          Salvador Lopez, an ardent activist and UP President during the Marcos time, had emulated the current democratic procedures that the university is supposed to employ – “student autonomy in handling its affairs, appointments of student regents, faculty participation through “democratic consultation” in selections of department chairs and college deans, etc.” (Dalisay, 2009).
-          1970s: The heated and bloody encounter between the military and the protesters, that left hundreds injured and four students dead of gunshot wounds ignited the fire of the First Quarter Storm—a turning point in Philippine History. (Ocampo, 2012).

UP has always been known for its high involvement in national, political, and economic undertakings. One of the concrete manifestations of this involvement is the practice of activism within its bounds, which is a characteristic often associated with UP. It is even said that the university’s student political affairs may well be deemed as a microcosm of national politics (Abinales, 1992). Its standing as a leading academic foundation of the country earned its activism dynamics a national significance.

1950s

-          1950s: A faction formed between UP’s two major activist forces, the Greek-lettered fraternities and the Catholic group associated with the UP Student Catholic Action (UPSCA) (Abinales, 1992).

-          “From the time I entered UP in 1956 up to 1959, there was mass apathy among the students.” (Sison, 2008)

-          1959: The Student Cultural Association of the University of the Philippines (SCAUP) was organized with cultural nationalism as their battle cry.

1960s

-          1962:  Students showed their disapproval of the appointment of Carlos P. Romulo as UP President through demonstrations and counter-demonstrations led by the Student Union and the UPSCA, respectively (Epistola, 1985).

-          Mid-1960s, “Americanization” of the University was a big issue. The SCAUP, Kabataang Makabayan (KM), and University Student Council (USC) took the lead in protesting.

-          1968: Katipunang Makabansa, Kalayaan, Pagkakaisa, Samahan ng Demokratikong Kabataan (SDK), SCAUP, and KM and Partisans together with the USC and the Philippine Collegian staff were among the organizations in UP Diliman actively participated in mass protests (Epistola, 1985).

-          Before Romulo left his position as President, he asserted that student activism and faculty dissent were “in themselves important, for without them, the University of the Philippines would be nothing.” (Epistola, 1985).

1970s

-          Students got more involved in matters concerning other members of Philippine society such as the laborers, farmers, etc.

-          1971: During the gasoline price hike a 2 day blockade through barricades was organized by students in the University Avenue. Within the barricades were teach-ins and mass meetings. (Evangelista, 1985).

-          Salvador Lopez, an ardent activist and UP President during the Marcos time, had emulated the current democratic procedures that the university is supposed to employ – “student autonomy in handling its affairs, appointments of student regents, faculty participation through “democratic consultation” in selections of department chairs and college deans, etc.” (Dalisay, 2009).

-          1970s: The heated and bloody encounter between the military and the protesters, that left hundreds injured and four students dead of gunshot wounds ignited the fire of the First Quarter Storm—a turning point in Philippine History. (Ocampo, 2012).

10 months ago with 6 notes

AktibISKO at AktibISKA: Kabaka Ka Pa Ba?

AktibISKO at AktibISKA: Kabaka Ka Pa Ba?
A study on the UP student’s levels of engagement in social and political activities within and outside the university

This is a study featured by Factbytes which was conducted by the UP Communication Research Society as part of their Commrespondent series 3 years ago.

UP students are often associated with activism and other forms of political involvement. During the Marcos Era, activism in the university was said to be at its height. At present, it is assumed that activism in the university is on the d
ecline. However, many still claim that students’ involvement in university and national issues is still very much alive.

The UP Communication Research Society is 
interested in looking into the state of UP students’ knowledge and engagement in university and national issues. Thus, posing the question: How engaged are UP students on social and political activities related to the university and national issues during the year 2010 (June-December)? In line with this, the researchers seek to explore UP students’ motivation behind being engaged or disengaged in social and political activities related to university and national issues. To answer these questions, the researchers outlined the following objectives:


- Determine how knowledgeable UP students are on issues within and outside the university during the year 2010 (June-December)

- Know the levels of engagement of UP students in social and political activities within and outside the university

- Explore UP students’ motivations behind being engaged or disengaged in social and political activities related to university and national issues

This study can provide a picture of UP students’ current knowledge and engagement in social and political activities within and outside the university.

1 year ago with 1 note

College of Human Kinetics

Last March 2013, Factbytes conducted a survey among UP Diliman students to determine the extent to which they associate 25 pairs of predetermined traits to the eight colleges found “most stereotyped” by the respondents of an earlier, preparatory survey.

The questionnaire had scales of 1 to 5, where an adjective is placed beside 1 and its opposite is placed beside 5. The respondents were asked to indicate where between the two they perceive the students of a given college to belong. The same set of pairs were used for all eight colleges. After the survey, the mean of each scale was calculated and the results are presented to you.

To the 267 respondents, students from the College of Human Kinetics are: 

1 year ago with 1 note

College of Fine Arts

Last March 2013, Factbytes conducted a survey among UP Diliman students to determine the extent to which they associate 25 pairs of predetermined traits to the eight colleges found “most stereotyped” by the respondents of an earlier, preparatory survey.

The questionnaire had scales of 1 to 5, where an adjective is placed beside 1 and its opposite is placed beside 5. The respondents were asked to indicate where between the two they perceive the students of a given college to belong. The same set of pairs were used for all eight colleges. After the survey, the mean of each scale was calculated and the results are presented to you.

To the 267 respondents, students from the College of Fine Arts are:




1 year ago with 26 notes